Jonathan Langton


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Conferences, Congresses and Projects Winding Down

For the first time in quite a long while not every spare moment is being over-shadowed by the knowledge that I really ought to be working on some side project or other.

One such project has been the book on Islamic finance that I have been working on following my brief time working at the Center of Islamic Economics and Finance at IE Business School.  The manuscript for that book was submitted to the publishers some time ago and I am now waiting to receive their proofs and corrections before printing goes ahead.  The book, now available for pr-order, should be available in December.

The other side project which has occupied a lot of time has been the teaching case that we have been developing with GE.  Based on their landmark sukuk issuance of 2009, it was originally intended to be part of the Islamic finance book, however it is still being developed as case study for IE courses that teach Islamic finance.  At the end of May we travelled to New York and then up to GE Capital headquarters in Stamford, Connecticut, to interview some of the main people involved in the deal, including Kathryn Cassidy, Corporate Treasury Senior Vice President, and Christopher Coffey, Managing Director of Long-Term Funding.  The final draft of the case was submitted to GE for their approval this week and we hope that this will be a useful and interesting teaching case.  In September it will also be developed as a multimedia case study.

I was recently fortunate enough to go to Lisbon to represent IE Business School’s E-learning Department at the AACE, Ed-Media 2011, World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications.  There I made a presentation about the results of some analysis we have performed on IE’s database on the use of multimedia documentation in courses over the last ten years.

Finally, I recently had the opportunity to attend a congress for salsa in Bilbao this month, at which I was invited, with my partner, to teach a workshop on bachatango.  The workshop had at least forty participants and was given in Spanish.  It was very well received and at the end of the class several participants came forward to ask if we knew of any professors of bachatango in the area; a good sign indeed.